Sunday, May 30, 2010

LAURIE ZUCKERMAN PHOTOGRAPHS CANYON PINTADO HISTORIC DISTRICT ROCK ART













Maybe this is why I don't paint much anymore—no improving on this perfect combination of Indian Rock Art and Mother Nature. I try though. Over the years I have developed many successful acrylic painting techniques that I teach to recreate these "antiqued" effects when I have my painting students at Front Range Community College work with ancient cultural symbols. I have them create the rock wall and then adorn them with images and "weather" those images to simulate the effects to time, water, wind, and erosion.

The Canyon Pintado National Historic District, where all of my photos were taken on May 15-16 of this year, has been occupied by people for 11,000 years. Most of the rock art is from the Fremont People, who lived in the canyon from 200 BC to 1200 AD and the Ute Indians, who lived in the area until the 1880s. The horse image is from the Ute Indians. It is the newest.

If you want to explore this area yourself, plan to visit for at least two days. There is much driving and some short hiking involved. My photos only represent a portion of the sites in the canyon. This website will provide you all the self-tour information:

http://www.rangely.com/CanyonPintado.htm

Saturday, May 1, 2010

LAURIE ZUCKERMAN'S PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE LA VETA MUSEUM IN SOUTHERN COLORADO



Laurie Zuckerman visited the La Veta Historical Museum in Southern Colorado to study the penitente items on display donated from the old secreted moradas in that region. The large Mother of Sorrows image itself is a popular chromolithograph from the early 20th century, and one of my most favorites, but the myriad holy cards and Victorian calling cards used as a decorative border is the first example of this framing technique that I have seen. Gives me ideas! Below, this crude painting of Jesus' crown of thorns decorates a large penitente cross used in religious processions, leaning against the wall alongside another decorate cross (shown in the bottom picture.) The collection was fascinating, despite being housed in a small and dimly-lit worn room. Showcases held a straw-appliqued wooden cross, a cross made of branches and barbwire, santos, and woven flogging implements.


LAURIE ZUCKERMAN'S PHOTOGRAPHS OF HISPANIC GRAVES IN COLORADO & NEW MEXICO







Laurie Zuckerman has been finishing up her photo documentation of Hispanic cemeteries in the Southwest in preparation for a publication on folk art graves. I have been working diligently on this series for the past six years, and since I won't be teaching this summer, I am hoping to make some final selections in editing my hundreds of photos for the book. Here are a few of my favorites that I went back to re-photograph last September in Southern Colorado. The first two pictures above is of the most unusual crucifix in all of the Southwest. It is small and crude and definitely one of a kind. The third carved sandstone Christ is another headstone in the same private cemetery east of Trinidad that my husband found to show me. The cross decorated with colored marbles is a new discovery from Cimarron, New Mexico.